in

19 Secret Local Drinks From Around the World You Need to Try

Psssst! Wanna try something a little different?

Travelling is one of the greatest experiences in your life. You get to see all the different countries, experience the many different customs and cultures and also sample the local food and booze.

However there are some secret delicacies that the locals like to keep to themselves. But don’t worry because we got you covered. This great list of 19 secret local alcoholic drinks from around the world all supplied by the nice guys over at Johnslots.com.

See, we know how to look after you. Cheers!

Mead

Mead was drunk in the Old English epic poem Beowulf, it was also the primary heroic drink in Celtic poetry.

Source – The Molly Pitcher Club

Where’s it from?

United Kingdom – One of the oldest alcoholic beverages in the world, mead is making a comeback in the UK.

What’s in it?

Fermented honey, water and sometimes combined with fruits, spices, grains or hops.

Lakka

Lakka (or cloudberry) is an amber-coloured edible fruit similar to the raspberry or blackberry. Lakka has an alcohol  volume of around 21%

Source – Ian Brown/Flickr

Where’s it from?

Finland – Sweet and mature, the longer the cloudberries are steeped, the richer the flavour of this traditional Finnish Liqueur.

What’s in it?

Cloudberries steeped in alcohol for 2- 6 months.

Akvavit

Akvavit literally translates as “water of life”.

Source – Visit Aalborg

Where’s it from?

Sweden – Drunk with summer smorgasbords and in the dark midwinter, Akvavit is a celebratory shot, which is often consumed immediately following a song, when it is called a snapsvisa.

What’s in it?

Herbal, spiced flavourings (may include caraway, cardamom, cumin, anise, fennel, lemon or orange peel and dill)

Patxaran

It is a sweet brown coloured liquor with 25-30% alcohol that is served as a digestif to be served after dinner.

Source

Where’s it from?

Spain – It is typically drunk in the Navarre and Basque Country, but it’s popular all over Spain.

What’s in it?

Distilled slow berries, coffee beans and cinnamon or anise.

Gløgg

Gløgg is often served at special gløgg parties during the festive season, typically alongside a Norwegian-style rice pudding called risgrøt.

Source – Soendag.dk

Where’s it from?

Norway – A mulled wine traditionally drunk around Halloween and Christmas time, gløgg is served hot and is a key part of Norwegian festivities in the colder months.

What’s in it?

Red wine, almonds, cardamom, cinnamon, raisins, ginger, cloves, pruned and orange juice and peel

Jenever

Jenever is typically drunk as a neat shot, usually as a chaser after beer.

Source – Holland.com

Where’s it from?

Netherlands – This is the juniper-flavoured traditional liquor of the Netherlands, which eventually gave rise to the invention of gin.

What’s in it?

Juniper and malt alcohol

Hanini

The liqueur was named after the HMS Hanini, owned by the Magro family, which eventually sunk after decades of service transporting herbs, carobs and cereals across ports in the Mediterranean.

Source – Savina Gozo

Where’s it from?

Malta – Flavoured with carob, hanini ia a widely available after-dinner digestif in Malta and across the Mediterranean.

What’s in it?

Carob liqueur

Kräuterlikör

Traditionally drunk neat as a digestif, kräuterlikörs have a high sugar content compared to bitters. They can range from 15 – 44% ABV.

Source – Chefkoch.de

Where’s it from?

Germany – Kräuterlikör dates back to medieval authors like Hildegard of Bingen who wrote of mixtures of alcohol and bitter substances used as medicine.

What’s in it?

Liqueur and herbs & spices

Gammel Dansk

The complete recipe for Gammel Dansk is a secret. Its name literally translates as “Old Danish”.

Where’s it from?

Denmark – Traditionally drunk by Danes at festive occasions Gammel Dansk is a bitter liquor often consumed at breakfast, brunch, wedding anniversaries and birthday celebrations.

What’s in it?

Rowan berry, anise, yellow gentian, angelica, ginger, Seville orange, star anise, laurel, cinnamon and nutmeg.

Suze

In 1912, the artist Pablo Picasso depicted a bottle of Suze in his collage Verre et bouteille de Suze.

Source – Geekandfood.fr

Where’s it from?

France – Bitter, floral and earthy, with a touch of sweetness Suze is an apéritif made from the gentian root which grows in the mountains of France.

What’s in it?

Gentian root and bitters

Aragh Sagi

The name Aragh Sagi literally means as “doggy distillate” after the Meikadeh company produced Aragh which had a picture of a beagle on the bottle.

Where’s it from?

Iran – Before the 1979 revolution Aragh Sagi was traditionally produced in several Iranian cities. After it was outlawed in 1979, it became a black market and underground business.

What’s in it?

Raisins and dates of the saccharum plant

Brem

Sweet and acidic, this beer-like beverage has an ABV of 5% – 15%. Brem can be either white or red depending on the proportions of white and black glutinous rice used in production.

Source – M.Jonny

Where’s it from?

Bali – Brem has a role in temple ceremonies of Hinduism called Tetabuhan. It is used as offering beverage for Buto Kala (Kala the Giant) in order to evoke harmony.

What’s in it?

Fermented rice and dry-starter called ragi tape

Chicha De Jora

It is traditional to spill the first sip of beer on the ground saying “Pachamam, Santa Tierra” as an offering to Earth Mother (Pachamama in Quechual).

Source – Verema.com

Where’s it from?

Andes – A traditional drink from the Andes that comes from the Inca times, today enjoyed in small Andean villages in the Sacred Valley. The beer has a thick foam, sweet note and a sour, cider-like after-taste.

What’s in it?

Jora corn

Tsipouro

Depending on the time of year, tsipouro is used either as refreshment, where it is chilled in a shot glass or on ice or as a hot beverage.

Source – tour-market.gr

Where’s it from?

Greece – Often confused with raki and ouzo, tsipouro is a strong distilled spirit 40-45% ABV, traditionally made in Thessaly

What’s in it?

Fermented grapes, often flavoured with anise.

Kvass

This very light alcohol beverage is classified as a non-alcoholic drink by Russian standards. The alcohol content from fermentation is typically low (0.5-1.0%).

Source – Mricon/Flickr

Where’s it from?

Russia – Traditional kvass was re-purposed in the early 2000s as an alternative to western drinks as part of an “anti-cola-nisation” campaign.

What’s in it?

Fermented rye bread (known as black bread in Russia)

Sljivovica

Slivovitz is usually drunk neat and unchilled as it is thought the flavour of the plums is most noticeable at room temperature.

Source – Serbia.com

Where’s it from?

Serbia – Found across Eastern Europe, this spirit is brewed by many Serbians in their homes, though commercial versions are available. Slivovitz of often consumed at important events such as birthdays and weddings.

What’s in it?

Plum brandy

Amaro

Amaro is usually served in a small wine glass-shaped glass. It is mostly drunk neat but mixing with ice or soda water is not unheard of.

Source – Liquer.com

Where’s it from?

Italy – Italians love an after dinner digestif. This more unusual option consumed as an after-dinner intended to aid digestion.

What’s in it?

Artichoke, an array of plants and herbs. Other versions are made from black truffles, rhubarb, fennel or walnuts.

Feni

In the coconut palm toddy version of the drink, a toddy tapper called a “rendier” undertakes the gruelling and lengthy process of collecting juice from the bud of palm tree flowers.

Source – Fenidrink.com

Where’s it from?

India – Exclusively made in Goa, this usually home-brewed alcoholic beverage has a typical ABV of 42-45%.

What’s in it?

Cashew or coconut palm toddy

Makegeolli

At 6-8% ABV, makegeolli is a light alcoholic beverage which can also be flavoured with corn, chestnuts and apples.

Source – geonbae.com

Where’s it from?

South Korea – The first mention of this milky alcoholic drink was in the founding story of the Goguryeo during the reign of KIng Dongmyeung who was born in 58 BC.

What’s in it?

Rice or wheat mixed with nuruk (a Korean fermentation starter)

Written by Riley

Joyenergizer Art Editor

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

25 Batshit Crazy Inventions That Never Caught on

What ‘Magic Motor Cars’ Would Harry Potter Characters Drive?